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Ordained Servant Online

A Journal for Church Officers

E-ISSN 1931-7115

Ordained Servants

Ordained Servant Cover

January 2007

From the Editor. This issue marks, not only the beginning of a new year, but also the appearance of newly written material for your edification as ordained servants. I thought it useful to take up the name of our journal as our theme for service in this new year.

Pastor Bill Shishko writes a very thoughtful and useful reflection on the example of the late Elder Herb Muether's many decades of ministry in the OPC. Having worked with Elder Muether in the early years of my ministry in New Rochelle, I can attest to the excellence of his example. Pastor Shishko also reviews two helpful books on the eldership from each of the last two centuries. Dr. George Knight's valuable article reminds deacons of their biblical roots. Finally, my editorial is a revised version of my 1987 forward to a republication of Samuel Miller's American Presbyterian classic The Ruling Elder, originally published in 1831.

Among the expanded features of this year's Ordained Servant will be many more book reviews, so that officers can stay abreast of books important to their task of serving the Lord's church. Due to the number that I intend to publish they will not always be coordinated with the theme of each issue. Please note the newly posted "Submissions, Style Guide, and Citations" on the bottom of the page.

Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Blessings in the service of the Lamb,
Gregory Edward Reynolds

Ordained Servant exists to help encourage, inform, and equip church officers for faithful, effective, and God glorifying ministry in the visible church of the Lord Jesus Christ. Its primary audience is ministers, elders and deacons of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, as well as interested officers from other Presbyterian and Reformed churches. Through high quality editorials, articles, and book reviews we will endeavor to stimulate clear thinking and the consistent practice of historic Presbyterianism.

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