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Ordained Servant Online

A Journal for Church Officers

E-ISSN 1931-7115

Promise Keepers

Ordained Servant Cover

March 2008

From the Editor. Why is it that vows and promises are taken so lightly? Let me suggest that the culture of informality is both a cause and an effect of such infidelity. I call it the cult of informality because if one—even graciously—refuses to participate, one is likely to be shunned. Comfort is king—which is to say individual feelings are paramount. Thus, thinking about human dignity and the importance and feelings of others is almost ignored. Attention to good form in attire, manners, speech, and formalities of all kinds are abandoned. Vows are a central feature of formal culture, so it should not be a surprise that no one, even church officers, takes them very seriously anymore. We should be loving exceptions to that trend.

In this issue of OS we will consider the problem of informality and suggest some ways in which we can benignly challenge the conventional wisdom. Brent Ferry answers the question, Does divorce end a marriage, or are people, once married, always married in God's eyes? G. I. Williamson calls ministers to consider the importance of their vows. Diane Olinger reviews an insightful and encouraging new book, Keeping House.

Blessings in the Lamb,
Gregory Edward Reynolds

Ordained Servant exists to help encourage, inform, and equip church officers for faithful, effective, and God glorifying ministry in the visible church of the Lord Jesus Christ. Its primary audience is ministers, elders and deacons of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, as well as interested officers from other Presbyterian and Reformed churches. Through high quality editorials, articles, and book reviews we will endeavor to stimulate clear thinking and the consistent practice of historic Presbyterianism.

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