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New Horizons

January, 2019: Homesick and Holy

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Contents

The entire issue is available in the following formats: PDF  ePub  and  Mobi 

Homesick and Holy

At one time, “homesickness” was chiefly a medical term, the English translation of a disease called nostalgia, from the Latin nostos, “homecoming,” and algia, “pain.” Coined in 1688 to describe a strange physical ailment that had been almost instantly cured upon the patient’s return home, nostalgia was last written as the cause of death on a death certificate in 1918.

Homesickness has plummeted in serious use since then, banished to kindergarten classrooms or maybe freshman dorms. Our travel-loving, globalist culture does not seem to have time for it; we are encouraged to be at home in every corner of the world. Maintaining a vital connection to just one seems to be either narrow-minded or wimpy—or both. Never a bragging right, homesickness today has become downright shameful. Read more

Longing for Heaven, Longing for God

C. S. Lewis wrote, “If I find in myself desires which nothing in this world can satisfy, the only logical explanation is that I was made for another world.” Augustine wrote, “O God, you made us for yourself and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in you.”

These two quotations capture the affectional pulsebeat of the Christian life: a longing for another world, a longing for God. Read more

A Christian Response to Disaster

If it’s late summer in North America, the images and videos are hard to miss. As yet another hurricane shows up on the radar, it dominates cable and internet news. Slideshows with hundreds upon hundreds of photographs, interviews, and before-and-after satellite images all weave together a composite story of disaster, ruin, survival, and bravery.

Perhaps we have only experienced these disasters through the news cycle and have grown accustomed to the rhythm of forecast, evacuation, landfall, and disaster. Maybe our hearts have grown numb to the real heartache and pain that are inseparably linked to these personal stories that we receive from the impersonal news. Read more

 
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